SOME OF OUR BEER STYLES

BOHEMIAN STYLE PILSENER
Bohemian-style pilseners have a slightly sweet and evident malt character and a toasted, biscuit-like, bready malt character. Hop bitterness is perceived as medium with a low to medium-low level of noble-type hop aroma and flavor. This style originated in 1842, with “pilsener” originally indicating an appellation in the Czech Republic. Classic examples of this style used to be conditioned in wooden tanks and had a less sharp hop bitterness despite the similar IBU ranges to German-style pilsener. Low-level diacetyl is acceptable. Bohemian-style pilseners are darker in color and bigger in final gravity than their German counterparts.
30-45 IBU (BITTERNESS)
4.1-5.1% ABV (ALCOHOL)



DARK LAGER
Sometimes called black lagers, they may remind some of German-style dunkels, but they are drier, darker and more roast-oriented.These very dark brown to black beers have a surprisingly pale-colored foam head (not excessively brown) with good cling quality. They have a mild roasted malt character without the associated bitterness. Malt flavor and aroma is at low to medium levels of sweetness.
22-30 IBU (BITTERNESS)
3.8-4.9% ABV (ALCOHOL)



SEMIDARK LAGER
Ranges from copper to reddish brown in color. The beer is characterized by malty aroma and slight malt sweetness. The malt aroma and flavor should have a notable degree of toasted and/or slightly caramelized malt character. Hop bitterness is low to medium-low.
22-28 IBU (BITTERNESS)

4.5-5.5% ABV (ALCOHOL



BALTIC-STYLE PORTER
A smooth, cold-fermented and cold-lagered beer brewed with lager yeast. Because of its alcoholic strength, it may include very low to low complex alcohol flavors and/or lager fruitiness such as berries, grapes and plums (but not banana; ale-like fruitiness from warm-temperature fermentation is not appropriate). This style has the malt flavors of a brown porter and the roast of a schwarzbier, but is bigger in alcohol and body.
35-40 IBU (BITTERNESS)
7.6-9.3% ABV (ALCOHOL)


FRUIT AND FIELD BEER
Fruit beers are made with fruit, or fruit extracts are added during any portion of the brewing process, providing obvious yet harmonious fruit qualities. This idea is expanded to “field beers” that utilize vegetables and herbs.
5-45 IBU (BITTERNESS
2.5-12% ABV (ALCOHOL)


HERB AND SPICE BEER
This is a lager or ale that contains flavors derived from flowers, roots, seeds or certain fruits or vegetables. Typically the hop character is low, allowing the added ingredient to shine through. The appearance, mouthfeel and aromas vary depending on the herb or spice used. This beer style encompasses innovative examples as well as traditional holiday and winter ales.
5-40 IBU (BITTERNESS)
2.5-12% ABV (ALCOHOL)


SMOKE BEER
When malt is kilned over an open flame, the smoke flavor becomes infused into the beer, leaving a taste that can vary from dense campfire, to slight wisps of smoke. This style is open to interpretation by individual brewers. Any style of beer can be smoked; the goal is to reach a balance between the style’s character and the smoky properties. Originating in Germany as rauchbier, this style is open to interpretation by U.S. craft brewers. Classic base styles include German-style Marzen/Oktoberfest, German-style bock, German-style dunkel, Vienna-style lager and more. Smoke flavors dissipate over time.

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RYE BEER
In darker versions, malt flavor can optionally include low roasted malt characters (evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel) and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Low-level roasted malt astringency is acceptable when balanced with low to medium malt sweetness. Hop flavor is low to medium-high. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. The addition of rye to a beer can add a spicy or pumpernickel character to the flavor and finish. Color can also be enhanced and may become more red from the use of rye. The ingredient has come into vogue in recent years in everything from stouts to lagers, but is especially popular with craft brewers in India pale ales. To be considered an example of the style, the grain bill should include sufficient rye such that rye character is evident in the beer.

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GLUTEN FREE
Barley, wheat, oats, rye and spelt commonly contain gluten, so look for other fermentables to be featured in these beers. A beer (lager, ale or other) that is made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates. Ingredients do not contain gluten.

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AMERICAN INDIA PALE ALE/IPA
Characterized by floral, fruity, citrus-like, piney or resinous American-variety hop character, this style is all about hop flavor, aroma and bitterness. This has been the most-entered category at the Great American Beer Festival for more than a decade, and is the top-selling craft beer style in supermarkets and liquor stores across the U.S.
50-70 IBU (BITTERNESS)

6.3-7.5% ABV (ALCOHOL)


ENGLISH INDIA PALE ALE/IPA
Steeped in lore (and extra hops), the IPA is a stronger version of a pale ale. Characterized by stiff English-style hop character (earthy, floral) and increased alcohol content. English yeast lends a fruity flavor and aroma. Different from its American counterpart, this style strikes a balance between malt and hops for a more rounded flavor. There is also a lot of mythology surrounding the creation of this style, which is still debated today.
35-63 IBU (BITTERNESS)

5-7% ABV (ALCOHOL)


IMPERIAL INDIA PALE ALE
High hop bitterness, flavor and aroma. Hop character is fresh and evident from utilization of any variety of hops. Alcohol content is medium-high to high and notably evident with a medium-high to full body. The intention of this style is to exhibit the fresh and evident character of hops.
65-100 IBU (BITTERNESS)

7.5-10.5% ABV (ALCOHOL)


AMERICAN PALE ALE
An American interpretation of a classic English style. Characterized by floral, fruity, citrus-like, piney, resinous, or sulfur-like American-variety hop character, producing medium to medium-high hop bitterness, flavor and aroma. American-style pale ales have medium body and low to medium maltiness that may include low caramel malt character.
20-45 IBU (BITTERNESS)

4.2-6.2% ABV (ALCOHOL)



CASCADIAN DARK ALE (BIPA)
Characterized by the perception of caramel malt and dark roasted malt flavor and aroma. Hop bitterness is perceived to be medium-high to high. Hop flavor and aroma are medium-high. Fruity, citrus, piney, floral and herbal character from hops of all origins may contribute to the overall experience.
50-70 IBU (BITTERNESS

6-7.5% ABV (ALCOHOL)


WEIZENBIER
Hefeweizens are straw to amber in color and made with at least 50 percent malted wheat. The aroma and flavor of a weissbier comes largely from the yeast and is decidedly fruity (banana) and phenolic (clove). “Weizen” means “wheat” and “hefe” means “yeast.” There are multiple variations to this style. Filtered versions are known as “kristal weizen” and darker versions are referred to as “dunkels,” with a stronger, bock-like version called “weizenbock.” This is commonly a very highly carbonated style with a long-lasting collar of foam.
10-15 IBU (BITTERNESS)

4.9-5.6% ABV (ALCOHOL)


STOUT
A coffee- and chocolate-forward ale, but with a hop aroma and flavor, often from a citrus-forward variety. American stouts are bold, with a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Fruity esters should be low, but head retention high. The addition of oatmeal is acceptable in this style and lends to the body and head retention.
35-60 IBU (BITTERNESS)

5.7-8.9% ABV (ALCOHOL)


IMPERIAL STOUT
American-style imperial stouts are the strongest in alcohol and body of the stouts. Black in color, these beers typically have an extremely rich malty flavor and aroma with full, sweet malt character. Bitterness can come from roasted malts or hop additions.
50-80 IBU (BITTERNESS)

7-12% ABV (ALCOHOL)


BARLEY WINE ALE
A strong ale that leans heavily on malt characteristics for flavor. With a wide color range and typically high in alcohol, this is a style that is often aged and will evolve well over time. As they advance in age, these beers develop oxidative characteristics including honey and toffee flavors and aromas, darker colors, lessened bitterness and more.
40-60 IBU (BITTERNESS)

8.5-12% ABV (ALCOHOL)
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